Reported hate crimes

Statistics on police reports with identifed hate crime motives. Published biannualy.

    Statistical tables
    About the statistics

About the statistics

The hate crime statistics produced by the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention (Brå) are based on the following definition:

Crimes against an individual, a group of individuals, property, an institution or a representative for one of these, motivated by fear of, or hostility or hate towards the victim based on race, skin colour, nationality or ethnic background, religious belief, sexual orientation or transgender identity or expression, which the perpetrator believes, knows or perceives the individual or group of individuals to have.

Motive categories

Xenophobia/racism (of which Afrophobia and anti-Roma are subcategories), anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, Christianophobia, otherwise anti-religious, sexual orientation and transphobia.

Method

Computerised search based on a list of 383 search words, applied to a random sample of fifty per cent of police reports relating to a number of specific crime categories. Reports identified by this computerised search method are studied manually in three steps by at least two different researchers at the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention (Brå). Details of reports considered to meet Brå’s definition of a hate crime are coded. The coded variables and the assessment of whether the report includes a hate crime are double-checked by a second researcher. Finally, an estimation procedure is applied to produce population-level estimates based on the random sample of police reports examined. These population-level estimates constitute the statistics on police reports with identified hate crime motives.

    Summary of findings 2018
  • Of the police reports recorded in 2018, a total of 7 090 were identified by Brå as containing a hate crime motive. This is 11 per cent more than in 2016 and 29 per cent more than in 2013.
    Figure 1 illustrates the number of police reported offences with an identified hate crime motive between 2008 and 2018. Following an initial decrease, the number of police reported offences remained stable between 2010 and 2013. Thereafter, and until 2015, an increase is visible.
  • The largest increase in offences with a hate crime motive (compared to 2016) can be observed for the xenophobic/racist and anti-Semitic motives and for the sexual orientation motive. For full information on the number of identified hate crime reports for each hate crime motive, please refer to Table A1 in the appendix.
  • The breakdown of the various hate crime motives was almost the same in 2018 as in 2016, with only minor variations. The motives were broken down as follows:
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  •  
    • 69 per cent (4,870 reports) had a xenophobic/racist motive
    • 11 per cent (760 reports) had a motive concerning sexual orientation
    • 8 per cent (560 reports) had an Islamophobic motive
    • 4 per cent (280 reports) had an anti-Semitic motive
    • 4 per cent ( 290 reports) had a Christianophobic motive
    • 4 per cent (260 reports) hade otherwise anti-religious motive
    • 1 per cent (80 reports) had a transphobic motive.
  • ​Data from the hate crime statistics 2018.

Reported hate crime

Number of police reported offences with an identified hate crime motive, 2008–2016 and 2018¹. Source: Hate Crime 2018

Reported hate crime, other motives

Number of police reported offences with an identified hate crime motive, 2008–2016 and 2018¹. Source: Hate Crime 2018

¹) Until 2016 the hate crime statistics were produced every year, and thereafter every second year. This means that there are no data for the year 2017.

Publications

Hate Crime 2018 English version of report 2019:13. (2019:13)